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FBI Report Says Active Shooter Incidents on the Rise

The first seven years that were reviewed had an average of 6.4 incidents per year, while the last seven years showed 16.4 incidents annually.

By Robin Hattersley Gray · September 25, 2014

    Active shooter incidents are becoming more frequent, with the number of mass shootings more than doubling in the past seven years compared to the previous seven, an FBI report has found.

“A Study of Active Shooter Incidents in the United States Between 2000 and 2013” says the first seven years that were reviewed had an average of 6.4 incidents per year, while the last seven years showed 16.4 incidents annually. Seven in 10 incidents occurred either in a commerce/business or educational environment, and the number of casualties, not including shooters, totaled 1,043.

The study, which was released on Wednesday, reviewed 160 incidents. Two of the four events with the highest casualty counts occurred at academic institutions: Virginia Tech in 2007 (32 killed and 17 wounded) and Sandy Hook Elementary School (27 killed and two wounded). The other two events with the greatest number of casualties were the Aurora, Colo., theater mass shooting in 2012 (12 killed and 58 wounded) and Ft. Hood attack in 2009 (13 killed and 32 wounded).

Other major findings from the study include:

  • All but six of the 160 incidents involved male shooters (and only two involved more than one shooter).
  • More than half of the incidents—90 shootings—ended on the shooter’s initiative (i.e., suicide, fleeing), while 21 incidents ended after unarmed citizens successfully restrained the shooter.
  • In 64 incidents (40.0%), the shooters committed suicide; 54 shooters did so at the scene of the crime.
  • In 21 of the 45 incidents where law enforcement had to engage the shooter to end the threat, nine officers were killed and 28 were wounded.
  • The largest percentage of incidents—45.6 percent—took place in a commercial environment (73 incidents), followed by 24.3 percent that took place in an educational environment (39 incidents). The remaining incidents occurred at the other location types specified in the study—open spaces, military and other government properties, residential properties, houses of worship, and healthcare facilities

More than half of the incidents—90 shootings—ended on the shooter’s initiative (i.e., suicide, fleeing), while 21 incidents ended after unarmed citizens successfully restrained the shooter.

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NEW NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH WEBSITE.  Visit nationalneighborhoodwatch.org for the latest information on how to establish a watch organization in your local community/neighborhood.

HURRICANE SEASON.  Weather forecasters are predicting an earlier than usual s eason indicating that the season will start much earlier this year.  Please visit  www.ReadyVirginia.gov for tips on how to prepare your family for a natural disaster.

FIREARMS ON CAMPUS.  State law and college policy both prohibit weapons inside college facilities.  Weapons, primarily firearms are permited on campus if secured in a vehicle by persons possessing valid “Concealed Carry Permits”

TORNADO APPLICATION.  As you know, tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms. Spawned from powerful thunderstorms, tornadoes can cause fatalities and devastate a neighborhood in seconds. Damage paths can be in excess of one mile wide and 50 miles long and every state is at some risk from this hazard.  The American Red Cross has developed  an official Tornado app. The Tornado app sounds an alarm when NOAA issues a tornado warning for your location, even when the app is closed. In addition, the app puts everything you need to know to prepare for an impending tornado in the palm of your hand.  This app may serve as a great tool for responders from all disciplines. Consider taking advantage of this tool.

911 CALLS FROM CELL PHONES COULD DELAY RESCUE:

It’s a growing concern for 911 dispatchers in our area; people calling in from cell phones, and not knowing where they are. A 911 call for a recent structure fire in Lynchburg was made from a cell phone. The caller did not know the address of the fire. Crews made it to the scene, but only after dispatchers were forced to find the right location. WSET – Full Story