Boykins Resident Named Commonwealth Legacy Scholar at PDCCC

Ashley Giorgi

Ashley Giorgi’s mom always told her that when she helps others, she should do it because it feels right in her heart, not to earn recognition.

 

After heeding her mother’s advice and performing more than 200 hours of community service for the Key Club at Southampton High School, the recognition came anyway—in a form that will allow her to pay for college.

 

The daughter of Debbie and Jerry Nahrebecki of Boykins and David Giorgi of Groton, Conn., was selected as the recipient of the Paul D. Camp Community College Camp Family Foundations Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship.

 

“I wouldn’t be able to receive this award {and others} if it were not for the leadership and community service opportunities provided by the Key Club,” Giorgi said.

 

A Commonwealth Legacy Scholarship winner is selected from each of the 23 institutions in Virginia’s Community College System. The scholarship, annually named at each school for the recipient of the Chancellor’s Leadership in Philanthropy Award, may be used on any of the 40 campuses in the VCCS. It provides $3,000 for a full year of tuition, books and fees.

 

“My favorite event that I volunteered for through the Key Club was the Special Olympics,” said Giorgi. “But I also worked with Habitat for Humanity and the Relay for Life through the club.”

 

She chaired a successful first-time Child Abuse Prevention Walk in Franklin during her senior year as president of the Key Club.

 

The only high school student on the committee, she recruited many of her peers to attend the event, which proved a success.

 

“It felt good to know that I helped make that happen,” she said. “Being a leader and mentor has really helped me. I would never ask for anything in return. To know that I have helped people is a good enough reward for me.”

 

It’s no surprise that Giorgi earned Outstanding Club Member for four years. At the district convention in Washington, D.C., she was honored as Distinguished Club President.

 

And at the awards assembly at the end of the year, she was awarded the Reese and Nancy McCormick Scholarship, named after the late couple who were pillars in the Franklin Kiwanis, which sponsors the Key Club.

 

Still afterward, she earned a Senior Service Award at graduation. She was presented the award by Key Club Advisor Shellie McHenry.

 

In addition to Giorgi’s work with Key Club, she has gained leadership skills as a four-year member of the Student Government Association. Based on those skills, she was selected by the SGA sponsor to attend the Virginia Leadership Conference. A member of the National Honor Society, she has held membership in the Varsity Club and the Christian Club, and participated in cross country and played on the field hockey team. She also served as a trainer for boys’ basketball. She was class president during her freshman year and class secretary during her sophomore year.

 

Giorgi was selected to be on the ‘Snow Court’ during her junior year.

 

“We were asked to raise money, with all proceeds going to the Trooper Hill Toy Drive,” she said. She was the top female fund-raiser and as a result, was crowned Snow Queen at the charity ball.

 

At her place of worship, True Word Christian Church in Franklin, she is active as a member of the Youth Group, worker in the nursery, and teacher during Vacation Bible School.

 

She participated in a two-year Early Childhood Education program in high school, where she worked with 3- to 4-year-olds, and successfully completed the NOCTI assessment exam.

 

“I had considered teaching,” she said. “But now I want to explore a degree in science—maybe in the medical field.” She plans to transfer to a four-year college or university after graduating from PDCCC.

 

As a Commonwealth Legacy scholar, Giorgi will mentor future scholarship recipients and participate in statewide events, such as the Student Leadership Conference, scheduled for late October in Roanoke. She also will be recognized, along with the rest of this year’s Legacy scholars, during the Virginia Foundation for Community College Education luncheon on Nov. 13.