Jul
27
07/27/2017

PDC Workforce Development, Basic Contractor Business Licensing Course

By Mary Ellen Gleason
 
Paul D. Camp Community College’s Workforce Development Center will be offering Basic Contractor Business Licensing Course on Tuesdays, August 15 and August 22 from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. The instructor is Donald Goodwin, Director of Community Development for the City of Franklin. The class will meet in Room 218 of the Workforce Center.
 
This eight-hour course will provide an overview of the statues and regulations that govern contractor licensing in Virginia. Topics in this course will include starting a business in Virginia, laws and regulations, contractor limits and classifications, Virginia State statues relating to contractors, statement of consumer protections, the licensing process, obtaining the contract, Customer Service and new home warranties, Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC), Underground utilities, insurance, Virginia taxes, labor law, erosion and sediment control, Virginia Occupational Safety and Health (VOSH), and liens.
 
The cost of the course which includes the textbook is $175. The Registration Deadline is August 10. The PDCCC Workforce Center is located on 100 North College Drive in Franklin. Any questions can be directed to (757) 569-6050 or workforce@pdc.edu

Jul
27
07/27/2017

Verizon’s First Ever All-Girl STEM Camp Culminates in Community Expo

VIL STEM Campers 01VIL STEM Campers (from left) Jasmine Brown, VIL VIL STEM Campers (from left) Jasmine Brown, Alexandra Mendiola, Nakari Blunt (back row), Meghan Stephens, Daeja Bailey, Caitlin Bergin, and Brianna Falcone at International Space Station Conference in DC with Dr. Cady Coleman (NASA astonaut), Dr. Elizabeth Blaber (USRA Scientist/Ames Research Center), and Craig Walton (aerospace entrepreneur).

VIL STEM Campers 02VIL STEM Campers listening to presentation about deep freeze reactions to liquid nitrogen at the VA Air & Space Museum.

VIL STEM Campers 03ODU’s Dean of Engineering, Dr. Stephanie Adams with Laney Phillips (left) and Gabrielle Johnson (right).

VIL STEM Campers 04Gabrielle Johnson looking through goggles at a scene she created with virtual reality.
 
By Mary Ellen Gleason, Desirée Urquhart, and Teri Zurfluh
 
Creating inspiration and pathways for women entering the fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) is the vision of Verizon’s Innovation Learning (VIL) Program for Girls and this vision is being realized for D’Miya King, Emily Hammond, Shynece Waters, Brianna Falcone, Aimee Corriea, Alexandra Mendiola, Juleesah Parker, and 42 other local middle school girls attending the three-week kick-off camp at the Regional Workforce Center at Paul D. Camp Community College (PDCCC).
 
This specialized STEM camp for girls will culminate with a Community Expo on July 28 from 1p – 3p. According to Teri Zurfluh, VIL STEM Camp Director, “We invite the public to join us to see the girls’ creative and futuristic projects that demonstrate their newfound skills in coding, digital storytelling, virtual and augmented reality, 3-D design and entrepreneurship.”
 
Verizon has never sponsored an all-girl STEM camp before, but this summer, only five rural community colleges in the entire country were identified by the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE) to pilot Verizon’s first effort in providing STEM education in a girls-only environment. This three-week camp will be followed by a year-long series of monthly events to continue developing these girls’ newfound STEM skills and abilities.
 
A visitor walking through the Workforce halls during this program sees girls wearing virtual reality goggles, remotely run miniature robots scooting about the halls operated by a pod of girls intently focused on that Ozobot with iPads in hand, and lots of eager faces engaged in technology and with each other. Many of these girls didn’t know each other prior to attending camp, as they come from many area middle schools; yet, they have become good friends in a few short weeks. And all are eager to talk about what they are learning.
 
D’Miya loves using Roller Coaster, a special virtual reality app. She has discovered that she enjoys coding. “I love learning stuff about putting commands in computers,” she said. While sitting together at lunch, Emily’s, Shynece’s, Brianna’s, Aimee’s and Alexandra’s collective enthusiasm about their experiences at this STEM camp was unmistakable. Their favorite newfound skills were virtual reality, operating apps and coding with their iPads. They all mentioned their love for the 3-D printer, specifically working with the 3Doodler pens to create projects and manipulating the tiny filament with the pens.
 
Juleesah likes stories with pictures. She brought that interest to the camp with her and because of that interest, she likes Morphi, a 3-D model design and printing app. Juleesah learned to code from an app called Playground and while this might look like a fun game, she explained that the app teaches the user to code easily and enables her to create those stories she loves so well.
 
Multiple expert speakers infused this STEM camp with their knowledge and enthusiasm. They represented women ranging from university deans, CEOs, researchers and nationally recognized leaders in STEM. Dr. Stephanie Adams, Dean of Engineering at Old Dominion University (ODU), shared with the girls her goal of “making sure there are women engineers to take my place in the future,” and invited the girls to come to ODU in the fall to “just build stuff with me in my engineering lab.” Dr. Trina Fletcher, a researcher and director of similar STEM camps for the National Association of Black Engineers all over the country, shared her “Rules for a Successful You,” outlining tips for success in any field of endeavor. One CEO asked to speak to these “rising phenoms” when she saw the tweets of Ellen Peterson, the 3D Printing instructor, who was celebrating some early and hard-fought successes with Morphi. Sophia Georgiou, Morphi’s CEO, offered an impromptu talk with the girls and gave a tutorial on Morphi via Skype. Zurfluh quipped, “It’s kinda like getting tips on using Microsoft from Bill Gates!”
 
While the girls had virtual field trips and visitors, they also traveled to the Virginia Air and Space Center in Hampton to explore STEM and space exploration, including demonstrations about materials engineering in deep cold space, interactive space exhibits, and a visit inside the Center’s Lunar Habitat. They even got to taste an “out of this world” treat: ice cream made with liquid nitrogen! A few girls also had the opportunity to travel to Washington, DC to attend the International Space Station R&D Conference at the Omni-Shoreham Hotel. They privately met with an astronaut, a scientist and a space entrepreneur; communicated with NASA astronauts in the International Space Station currently in a low orbit over Earth; and were interviewed by the media team from the Smart Girls organization founded by artist Amy Poehler and producer Meredith Walker.
 
Ms. Zurfluh explains that the secret to the success of the program is the outstanding team of instructors and staff that have been working tirelessly to make this experience the best possible for these middle school girls: Travis Parker, Asst. Director; Desirée Urquhart, PDCCC grants coordinator; instructors Jason Gabel (Coding & Virtual Reality), Ellen Peterson (3D Printing), Eric Scott and Keisha Nichols (Social Entrepreneurship and Digital Storytelling), and administrative assistant Danielle Stauffer. The IT team of Mark Evans, Zak Wade and David Felton from PDC’s Computing Services rounds out the “dream team” that Zurfluh calls, “one of the very best teams I’ve worked with in all my years at PDCCC.”
 
Support extended beyond the “dream team.” Through Mr. Parker’s network of relationships, the camp was fortunate to forge community partnerships with two local entrepreneurs – Greg Scott of Cover 3 that provided daily healthy breakfasts and lunches for the girls, and Charles “C.C.” Cooper of Kids Kab that transported students to camp from and back to designated locations throughout Franklin City and Southampton and Isle of Wight Counties.
 
And this camp isn’t the end… it’s only the beginning. “The challenge will be to maintain the excitement the girls have experienced during camp, while continuing to develop their interest and skills in STEM with continued monthly workshops and meaningful mentorships. We want Verizon and NACCE to say that we are the benchmark for all other all-girl STEM camps.”

Jul
27
07/27/2017

PDC Workforce Development, Basic Contractor Business Licensing Course

By Mary Ellen Gleason
 
Paul D. Camp Community College’s Workforce Development Center will be offering Basic Contractor Business Licensing Course on Tuesdays, August 15 and August 22 from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. The instructor is Donald Goodwin, Director of Community Development for the City of Franklin. The class will meet in Room 218 of the Workforce Center.
 
This eight-hour course will provide an overview of the statues and regulations that govern contractor licensing in Virginia. Topics in this course will include starting a business in Virginia, laws and regulations, contractor limits and classifications, Virginia State statues relating to contractors, statement of consumer protections, the licensing process, obtaining the contract, Customer Service and new home warranties, Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC), Underground utilities, insurance, Virginia taxes, labor law, erosion and sediment control, Virginia Occupational Safety and Health (VOSH), and liens.
 
The cost of the course which includes the textbook is $175. The Registration Deadline is August 10. The PDCCC Workforce Center is located on 100 North College Drive in Franklin. Any questions can be directed to (757) 569-6050 or workforce@pdc.edu

Jul
18
07/18/2017

PDC at Smithfield now offers nurse aide program

Those with a passion for helping people can now enroll in the Paul D. Camp Community College nurse aide program in Smithfield.
 
“We received site approval last week from the Virginia Board of Nursing,” said Dean of Nursing and Allied Health Dr. Debbie Hartman. “We are so excited that we can now let everyone know and begin recruiting for the program.”
 
The 24-credit hour program is designed to prepare students for full-time work as nurse assistants. A certified nursing assistant (CNA) provides basic care to patients in a healthcare setting, such as a hospital or long-term care facility, or even in the homes of patients through home healthcare services.
 
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the annual mean pay in Virginia for a CNA in 2016 was between $24,960 and $26,830. The demand to fill these positions is also expected to increase, which means facilities will be looking to fill CNA positions with skilled workers.
 
“This will provide a convenient location for Isle of Wight and the surrounding area students who want to begin a career in the healthcare profession,” said Hartman. “This is also the beginning of the pathway for the practical nursing and associate’s degree in nursing programs.”
 
Registration for fall 2017 classes is in progress. Classes start on Aug. 21. For more information, contact Carol Griffin, cgriffin@pdc.edu.

Jul
17
07/17/2017

Students take advantage of free proctoring services at Paul D. Camp Community College

Taking online college classes and accessing proctoring services go hand in hand for many university students. The PDC Testing Center offers proctoring services to PDC graduates as well as college students within the community who are enrolled in four-year colleges. Olivia Walker, a graduate of the PDC nursing program, and Jake Doiron, a student at Virginia Tech, are utilizing these services.
Olivia WalkerAfter graduating in 2015 from the PDC RN program, Walker began her nursing career at Sentara Obici Hospital and later transferred to the Courtland Health and Rehabilitation Center. She is currently enrolled in the Western Governor’s University bachelor’s degree program in nursing (BSN) while working at the Rehab Center. Walker’s future interest is nursing informatics, a relatively new field combining technology and clinical nursing.
 
PDC and the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) have a number of articulation agreements with other colleges and universities. These agreements allow students who have earned certain associate degrees to transfer from PDC or other VCCS colleges to senior institutions with little or no loss of credits.
 
The articulation agreement with Western Governor’s University (WGU) is specific to nursing graduates. Other articulations include Old Dominion University, Norfolk State University, James Madison University, and many other colleges and programs.
 
Western Governor’s University (WGU) derived its name from 19 U.S. governors who came together in 1995 to create a distance learning university focused on “learning and not time,” according to its website, making it the choice for many people with jobs and families who are looking for a bachelor’s or master’s degree in their field without the travel and deadlines.
 
According to Walker, WGU assigns a program mentor who is discipline specific. Her program mentor is a nurse. Other program mentors have degrees and experience in the discipline that they support. Walker said, “My WGU program mentor has been especially helpful. She not only helps me with the content of my classes, but the technology required for online classes.”
Jake DoironJake Doiron is a Virginia Tech student majoring in mining engineering. He has enrolled in an online math course on differential equations through Northern Virginia Community College (NVCC), but lives in the service area of PDC. Taking online courses in the summer helps to lighten his course load in the fall and spring.
 
He added, “The online math course through NVCC offers a significantly lower tuition rate.” Students would pay more at a four-year college. NVCC operates an Extended Learning Institute (ELI) that provides flexible online education in which students can take either 8-week or 16-week classes. While ELI boasts of offering their courses to students “anywhere in the world,” students taking these courses within Virginia can access proctoring services for their courses at the nearest community college.
 
The benefits of enrolling in online classes are many for university students. Having access to proctoring services at the nearest community college provides minimal travel time, free proctoring, and a prepared testing environment that increases the allures of online classes.
 
For students like Doiron, his academic schedule is lightened, the tuition costs are appealing, and the proctoring proximity is convenient. For university students like Walker, she can keep in touch with nursing faculty, receiving encouragement from the environment where she began her career. She also has received support for some of her submissions requiring more complex technology from PDC technology staff. For these students, they find testing support and encouragement for their online classes right around the corner at their community college.
 
For more information, contact Gleason, who also serves as the Franklin Campus Testing Administrator, at mgleason@pdc.edu.
 
Photos by Mary Ellen Gleason

Jun
30
06/30/2017

Native named director of PDC at Smithfield

~Antoinette Johnson begins duties August 1~

Antoinette JohnsonToni Johnson started out at PDC as an adjunct professor before serving as full-time faculty member for early childhood development, and dean of the Franklin campus and occupational/technical programs. She begins as director of PDC at Smithfield on August 1.
 
It has been a decade since Antoinette “Toni” Johnson joined Paul D. Camp Community College as an adjunct professor. Beginning August 1, she will serve the college as the director of PDC at Smithfield.
 
“As a native of Smithfield, I am excited to be home,” she said. “I am looking forward to promoting PDC, and working with students and stakeholders in the community to help the college be first choice.”
 
Many of Johnson’s duties will be an extension of what she is currently doing as dean of the Franklin Campus, a position she has held since May 2016. She served as interim dean for a year prior to that as well.
 
“I will ensure the center at Smithfield offers a learning environment conducive to high-quality instruction,” she said. Other duties include helping to develop the class schedule, advising students, assisting with admissions advising and orientation of new students, teaching early childhood development classes, and seeking and maintaining program-related partnerships and opportunities for the students.
 
“There are endless opportunities in which to explore that will help continue PDC’s value and viability, not only for the Town of Smithfield, but throughout Isle of Wight County and surrounding communities,” she said.
 
Johnson attained a Bachelor of Science degree in Interdisciplinary Studies from Norfolk State University in 1999 and a Master of Education degree in Early Childhood Education from the University of Phoenix in 2006. She is presently pursuing a Doctorate of Education degree in higher Educational Leadership at Concordia University. She has served as early childhood education director at The Children’s Center and has taught in Isle of Wight County Public Schools.
 
“Antoinette will bring a wealth of experience to the center in Smithfield, not to mention her community connections as a native,” said Vice President of Academic and Student Development Dr. Tara Atkins-Brady.
 
Johnson resides in Suffolk and is a member of Kingdom Empowerment Temple in Newport News, where her husband, Ed’Ward Johnson, is pastor. Together, they have one son, Aaron, who is a law school student, two daughters, Felicia and Kiyah, and three grandchildren. She is a 1990 graduate of Smithfield High School and is the daughter of Theresa Hall and the late Melvin Hall.

Antoinette Johnson with AalliyahToni Johnson and work study student Aalliyah Merricks review some information in the admissions office at PDC.

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