Twin brothers graduate from Administration of Justice Program at Paul D. Camp Community College

Jalen and Justin BooneTwin brothers, from left, Jalen and Justin Boone, are earning their bachelor degrees from ODU and will graduate from PDCCC May 15.
Watching a lot of television may not be such a bad thing after all. Justin and Jalen Boone of Courtland grew up viewing crime shows like “Dateline,” which ultimately aided them in choosing a course of study. On May 15, they will both graduate with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Administration of Justice-Police Science.
“I said to myself, I want to be around this and find a career path in this field,” Justin recalled about what he was thinking during his childhood.
Although the 21-year-old twin brothers’ first ambition was to join the military, health issues prevented them from enlisting. The 2011 graduates of Franklin High School heard testimonials about Paul D. Camp Community College and soon enrolled in classes at the college.
Jalen said, “Criminal justice is a life-long interest for us, and it is a field for which the need has grown. As long as you keep your nose clean, you will always have a job.” Justin added that there are so many branches in the field, that the sky is the limit. “When you major in something that involves connecting with people, you can go anywhere,” he said.
Justin and Jalen finished classes at PDCCC in Fall 2014 and Spring 2014, respectively. Although they were accepted at Virginia Commonwealth and George Mason universities, they chose to work toward their Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice at Old Dominion University with an anticipated graduation of Fall 2016.
Although plans are not set in stone for Justin after his ODU commencement, he will test the waters on several fronts, as he has many interests in the criminal justice field. “I am going to look into working with the State Police for a couple of years and then, I want to explore some branches, such as executive protection agent on a state or federal level, and if that isn’t exactly what I want, I may try the fields of public relations and social work.”
Jalen plans to work in security. “I want to work as a regional supervisor for a solution company like Brinks or Loomis,” he said.
The brothers took advantage of the Career Development Center’s array of services while at PDCCC. The program helps students from assistance with college admissions and funding to aid in job searches and employment guidance.
“They are super stars,” said Larry Brunson, job placement coach with the college’s Career Development Center. “They are on point with their career path and are a good example of young men who are grabbing what they can and going for it.”
The sons of Rashona Seaborn of Courtland and Gregory Boone of Suffolk had family influence when it came to continuing their education. Their mother earned her bachelor’s degree in Social Work from Virginia State University and their father completed course work at The Apprentice School at Newport News Shipbuilding.
Justin’s two-year-old son, Bryson Boone, also motivates him to do his best. In addition, the Boone twins’ grandmother, the late Laverne Seaborn of Courtland and grandfather, Raymond Seaborn of Franklin, have served as a support system, encouraging them to pursue their education.
“Our aunt, Mary Britt of Franklin, has also been our cheerleader,” said Jalen. “She took on the role of our grandmother after she passed and we love her to death.”
The brothers utilized financial aid while at the college and had a more seamless transfer to ODU due to the PDCCC’s articulation agreement with the university. “Paul D. Camp prepared us for our journey ahead,” said Justin. “I would recommend anyone coming out of high school to come here first to see if college is right for them. You can figure out your dream and save money.”
Justin and Jalen are involved in Success Without Limitations (SWL) and the Black Student Organization (BSO) at ODU. They also volunteer at the Foodbank of Southeastern Virginia in Norfolk.
After earning bachelor degrees, the brothers will go where job opportunities take them, even if it means moving out of the Tidewater area or the state to pursue their particular areas of interest.
“That will be the ‘great divide,’” Justin said, his arms spread wide, about sharing a lifetime of experiences with his brother. “But for now, we enrolled in all our classes together at ODU. We might as well be smart about this and use our availability as brothers to push each other.”